The Inclusivity Pathway Training (IPT) is designed to assist in the development of

skills necessary to facilitate inclusive learning situations and or working

environments, whether they be one-on-one, in a group, on the work floor,

personal, or in the classroom. It aims to build people’s confidence in using

basic skills and is based on the premise that the majority of interventions

of inclusion work inform the “what”, but not necessarily the “how”.

Furthermore, it is based on the premise that the majority of

diversity and inclusion interventions address surface

structures and fail to address underlying, structural, and

historically based impediments to inclusion.

The IPT is designed according to themes.

Participants go through a range of activities

based on a set of skillset themes. These

activities draw from a variety of

sources including theater,

psychodrama, games, and

psychology.

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RESTORATIVE

PRACTICE

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Restorative practice as put forth by Kelvin Cooper

(Bronx Community College) acknowledges the personal

and communal trauma that are core at dealing with

systems of inequality. Facilitating inclusion therefore

requires awareness and purposeful address of this

trauma. On a communal level it requires restoring what

has been broken down. On a personal level, engaging

diversity and inclusion is taxing work on one’s wellbeing,

hence taking care of oneself is essential as an

agent of transformation.

RESTORATIVE

PRACTICE

COGNITIVE

BEHAVIORAL

THERAPY

(CBT)

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy including REBT (Rational Emotive

Behavioral Therapy) and Psychodrama give insight and tools to

deal with the interrelated concepts of emotions, behavior and

cognitions. IPT is not therapy but utilizes elements from

cognitive therapy because its methods are designed

and proven to be helpful in problem and – action

focused behavioral changes. In addition, it aids

in addressing an often overlooked if not

avoided aspect of inclusive actions, namely

emotions.

COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL

THERAPY(CBT)

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Indigenous knowledge is a broad category within the academic arena

which, although not commonly taught, is a multidimensional body of

knowledge reflecting epistemological and ontological contributions from

indigenous people of all over the world. Academically it highlights the

perspective of colonized and marginalized peoples, and hence great

understanding of systematic inequalities in institutions, life experiences,

but also in knowledge production itself. Some key aspects of indigenous

knowledge are: a perspective that all are related; knowledge based in

local tradition, culture and experience; comfortability with a space of not

knowing; and the pursuit of knowledge as the pursuit of justice.

INDIGENOUS

KNOWLEDGE

INDIGENOUS

KNOWLEDGE

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Embodied knowledge emphasizes the role of the body in

learning and relating to others. It provides tools to go

beyond the intellect to make sure that learned information is

fully embraced and “lands” within a person. It also serves as

empowering to trust the body to step forward and take

action when needed.

EMBODIED

LEARNING

EMBODIED

LEARNING

ABOUT

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HOW TO USE THE IPT?

Aminata Cairo explains how the IPT was designed, its intended use and how to get the most out of the training.

 

DEVELOPMENT HISTORY

The IPT was designed out of Dr. Aminata Cairo’s 30+ years of experience as a community worker, community artist, psychologist and anthropologist, and through her more recent work at Leiden University and The Hague University of Applied Sciences. Significant contributions were made by Professors Kelvin Cooper (Bronx Community College) and Kathryn Bentley (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville). Initially called the Inclusivity Training Toolkit, the first pilot version was designed in 2017.

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CONTRIBUTORS TO 

PILOT PHASE

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CONTRIBUTORS TO 

PILOT PHASE

CONTRIBUTORS TO THE 

TESTING PHASE

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CONTRIBUTORS TO

THE 

TESTING PHASE

An NRO research fund was granted in 2019 for the development of the Inclusivity Training Toolkit

(now the Inclusivity Pathway Training). The original team from THUAS in collaboration with research staff from InHolland University of Applied Sciences and Leiden University proposed to refine and further develop the training program, and to develop a facilitators training program. The NRO provided funding for three years to do so. An essential part of this program is to make the process accessible to a wide audience to promote collective ownership.

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NRO RESEARCH

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ENGAGE/ PARTICIPATE/

SHARE/ EXPRESS

IDENTIFYING 

MECHANISMS OF 

EXCLUSION

CONNECT WITH

SOMEONE'S STORY

SAFE/

BRAVE SPACE

POSITIONALITY

LOWER INHIBITIONS

SELF-CARE

FORGIVENESS

LISTENING

SKILLS

BEING AN

ALLY

TRANSFORMING

CEREMONY

HONOR AND

CELEBRATE